Untitled

al-the-stuff-i-like:

abiblr:

fucky-str1pe:

themadfangirl:

kieradoe:

whatsortofamandoesntcarryatrowel:

Dad: Why do you think they do that?
Girl: Because the companies who make these try to trick the girls into buying the pink stuff instead of stuff boys want to buy.
[x]

that awkward moment when a child understands the harm of forcing gender roles better than most grown male politicians.

Always reblog.

I’m surprised that I haven’t reblogged this, to be honest.

I love that last gif.  She looks so frustrated.  Like “Um, hello, obviously girls and boys can like anything why doesn’t anybody get that???”

She does have a point though..

Kids who are smarter than adults though.

of course she has a point

fashioninhistory:

'May' Evening Dress  
Christian Dior  
Spring/Summer 1953
Dior reveled in the paradox of the natural and the sophisticated. The most telling example is his frequent self-presentation, not as a man who symbolized the authority of French taste, but rather as a simple gardener, farmer, and mill owner.  In “May,” flowering grasses and wild clover are rendered in silk floss on organza. This “simple” patterning of meadow-gone-to-weed is composed of the tiniest French knots and the meticulously measured stitches of the hand embroiderer, suggesting that for Dior, it was not only that beauty resides in the most rustic, but also that the most successful artifice is a beguiling naivété.

fashioninhistory:

'May' Evening Dress  

Christian Dior  

Spring/Summer 1953

Dior reveled in the paradox of the natural and the sophisticated. The most telling example is his frequent self-presentation, not as a man who symbolized the authority of French taste, but rather as a simple gardener, farmer, and mill owner.  In “May,” flowering grasses and wild clover are rendered in silk floss on organza. This “simple” patterning of meadow-gone-to-weed is composed of the tiniest French knots and the meticulously measured stitches of the hand embroiderer, suggesting that for Dior, it was not only that beauty resides in the most rustic, but also that the most successful artifice is a beguiling naivété.

hitrecord:

"The Beginning (REmix)"
REmix by CaptClare
HERE on hitRECord

hitrecord:

"The Beginning (REmix)"

REmix by CaptClare

HERE on hitRECord

manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Robert Bechtle.

Bechtle’s work is featured in "Still Life: 1970s Photorealism" at the Yale University Art Gallery. The exhibition, which is drawn from YUAG’s collection, was curated by Cathleen Chaffee and will be on view through March 9. It also includes work by Robert Cottingham, Ralph Goings, Duane Hanson, Malcolm Morley, Gerhard Richter, and John Salt. Bechtle is also exhibiting new paintings and drawings at New York’s Gladstone Gallery through February 22.

This is a corner in San Francisco’s Potrero Hill neighborhood near which Bechtle lives. He’s made both paintings and prints of scenes around these corner over the years. Two of the best are the 2000 painting Texas Street Intersection (above) and a related 2004 Crown Point Press-published print (below). Bechtle and MAN Podcast host Tyler Green discussed these two works and how and why they’re slightly different.

In 2005 Bechtle was the subject of a San Francisco Museum of Modern Art-organized retrospective that traveled to the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth and to the Corcoran Gallery of Art. His work is in numerous museum collections, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Gallery of Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.